This is default featured slide 1 title

This is default featured slide 1 title

You can completely customize the featured slides from the theme theme options page. You can also easily hide the slider from certain part of your site like: categories, tags, archives etc. More »

This is default featured slide 2 title

This is default featured slide 2 title

You can completely customize the featured slides from the theme theme options page. You can also easily hide the slider from certain part of your site like: categories, tags, archives etc. More »

This is default featured slide 3 title

This is default featured slide 3 title

You can completely customize the featured slides from the theme theme options page. You can also easily hide the slider from certain part of your site like: categories, tags, archives etc. More »

This is default featured slide 4 title

This is default featured slide 4 title

You can completely customize the featured slides from the theme theme options page. You can also easily hide the slider from certain part of your site like: categories, tags, archives etc. More »

This is default featured slide 5 title

This is default featured slide 5 title

You can completely customize the featured slides from the theme theme options page. You can also easily hide the slider from certain part of your site like: categories, tags, archives etc. More »

 

CisionScoops at USA Today & Harper’s Bazaar, New Additions to NYT, NBC News & WSJ, Plus More Media Updates

Cision’s research department makes over 20,000 media updates to our influencer database each day! Here are the latest moves to keep your media lists up to date and on point. All CisionScoops reflect original reporting from the Media Research team; if you have a scoop, send

For full article

How to Segment Journalists By Social Media Use

Best practices for marketing often, if not always, suggest some degree of segmentation for customers or the public. Finding different ways to identify behaviors and differentiate messaging to best suit these personas is crucial for most PR and marketing functions. Often, people write about journalists as “journalists”

For full article

Airlines could cash in on a $30 billion opportunity that would make pilots obsolete

airline pilot

With autonomous driving on the way, the natural progression is to consider the possibilities of autonomous or pilotless air travel.

It’s certainly not beyond the realm of possibility. After all, most modern commercial aircraft possess some sort of semi-autonomous flight capabilities. However, regardless of how advanced these planes are, they all require at least two pilots to be at the controls.

(Some smaller general aviation aircraft require only one pilot.)

But what if one day the airline industry could operate without pilots? It would certainly change the complexion of the industry.

After all, costs such as salaries, pensions, training, and the threat of pilot shortages could be done away with.

According to an analyst note published by UBS in August, pilotless flight could save the airline industry as much as $30 billion.

Of that $30 billion, $26 billion of the savings come from no longer having to pay pilots. Another $3 billion from cheaper insurance and lower training costs. Finally, there’s $1 billion saved from optimized operations from new pilotless technology.

Pilotless flight wouldn’t come to fruition overnight. Instead, it’s expected to take place in phases. Over the past 30 years, technology has rendered the navigator and the flight engineer obsolete, taking the number of flight crew down from four to just two. With further development, the workload in the cockpit will be further reduced to a point where only one pilot is required before autonomous technology renders the human pilot completely unnecessary.

However, UBS doesn’t expect full pilotless flight to be implemented before 2030. 

There are still some major challenges, the most difficult of which is convincing people to take a plane without a pilot. 

The results of a recent study conducted by UBS showed that 54% of the 8,000 people surveyed by the firm said they are unlikely to take a pilotless flight. According to UBS, the four groups least likely to board a pilotless plane are students and unemployed, nervous flyers or those concerned with aviation safety, those who book travel over the phone, and females.

Among those most likely to fly on a pilotless plane are people between the age of 18-34, people from the US, business travelers, and people who book their travel on location or through email.

SEE ALSO: We ate lunch at United Airlines’ secret invitation-only restaurant and it takes airport food to a whole new level

FOLLOW US: on Facebook for more car and transportation content!

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: 7 code phrases airline pilots use all the time — and what they mean

Read Original Article:

Alpek cutting off M&G over unpaid bills

The Alpek also doubts M&G will complete a major new plant

Source File:

Jay Baer Asks: Is Social Media And Journalism Linked?

Recently, Cision published the 2017 Global Social Journalism Study, conducted in partnership with Canterbury Christ Church University, which surveyed journalists on their social media habits, preferences and views. In the first of a series of videos, Jay Baer, founder of Convince & Convert and New York Times

For full article

The 27 Best Instagram Accounts for Design Inspiration

Instagram has become a finely curated destination for gorgeous photos, videos, and visual content that all clamor for the best Likes and comments. It’s as if the urge to visit a modern art museum can now be satisfied from the comfort of our own homes — or bus seats, or lunch breaks.

That is, if you follow the right people. As social media generally provides a platform for individuals to become brands, so it goes for the artists and designers who have found Instagram to be a method of building a miniature, digital art gallery — a social portfolio, if you will.

And as for the people seeking remarkable design work? Jackpot.

But to help you narrow your search, we’ve done a bit of our own curation of the best Instagram accounts to follow for design inspiration. We’ve broken the list down by category: illustration, graphic design, pop art and installation, color palettes, street art, photography, typography, and calligraphy — although, you might notice that some of the work below could fall onto more than one list. notice some of their work could fall into a number of different lists.

Check out how these artists are sharing their work with the world — we’re sure you’ll find them as inspiring as we do.

The 27 Best Instagram Accounts for Design

Click on a category below to jump to that section:

Illustration

1) Steve Harrington: @s_harrington

Steve Harrington is a Los Angeles-based designer who describes his own style as having a “psychedelic-pop aesthetic.” His Instagram is full of his brightly colored, playful illustrations, many of which he’s created for brands — most notably Nike, for which he’s designed sportswear, including shoes.

2) Rachel Ryle: @rachelryle

Rachel Ryle is an illustrator, an animator, and a storyteller — and she combines all three on her Instagram account. Most of her posts are beautiful, clever, and often super cute stop-motion videos like the one below. She told Mashable that each animation takes 15–20 hours from the beginning concept to final editing, on average. If you like her work, Instagram is the place to follow her: It’s her most dedicated channel for showcasing her work. 

 

Happy National Donut Day! I was thinking, wouldn’t it be nice to be one of “those people” who proudly post a picture of their six pack on Instagram? Let’s face it, donuts happen. So this is probably the closest I’ll ever get to achieving that dream. The good news is that with donuts we can all have a sweet six pack! Whether you’re a believer in this “hole-y” holiday or not, I hope you all enjoy this very special “fried-day”! Diet or not…donut hesitate, go treat yo’self! PS Of course today’s hidden emoji is this 👉🏻🍩👈🏻. See if you can spot it 😉 #ispyemojis #stopmotion #animation #art #drawing #illustration #instavideo #instavid #holiday #baking #doughnut #donut #pink #icing #sixpack #NationalDoughnutDay #NationalDonutDay #🍩

A post shared by Rachel Ryle (@rachelryle) on Jun 2, 2017 at 5:57am PDT

3) Mikey Burton: @mikeyburton

Mikey Burton, based out of Chicago, calls himself a “designy illustrator” — his way of saying he works part time in both. Burton has done work for clients like Converse, ESPN, Target, The New York Times, TIME Magazine, and Esquire. He’s been working on a lot of editorial pieces lately, which he posts proudly on his Instagram — along with other, often-whimsical illustrations both as sketches and as final, published projects.

 

Beer map I drew for @wsjoffduty Thank you @ufoundforest for the gig! Photo by @fmrphoto 🗺 🍻

A post shared by Mikey Burton (@mikeyburton) on Jan 3, 2017 at 5:57am PST

4) Jamel Saliba: @melsysillustrations

Jamel Saliba, a.k.a. Melsy, is equal parts artist and entrepreneur, having quit her job in her mid-twenties to become a successful, full-time fashion illustrator. Her sketches are beautifully done and cover themes like fashion, friendship, and love — all in the style of contemporary chic. Since her initial success on Etsy caught the eye of consumers and brands alike, Melsy’s done client work for Hallmark, T.J.Maxx, and Home Goods.

On Instagram, she posts a combination of illustrations added to her portfolio, as well as those celebrating events or holidays, like the illustration she posted for Halloween.

Graphic Design

5) Neil A. Stevens: @neil_a_stevens

Neil A. Stevens specializes in poster design, and he’s particularly good at creating sharp, dynamic pieces.  He’s created posters for many cities and countries around the globe, including a handful for the Tour de France. 

 

Out for a spin.

A post shared by Neil_A_Stevens (@neil_a_stevens) on Aug 3, 2017 at 12:20am PDT

6) Hey Studio: @heystuxdio

Hey Studio is made up of three designers: Ricardo Jorge, Veronica Fuerte, and Mikel Romero — and is one of Spain’s most popular graphic design studios. A lot of their work features stunning geometric shapes, which they post to their Instagram account in combination with pictures of their team during the creation process (and when they’re just fooling around).

Tip: Shuffle through the entire carousel of images in the post below to see the full dimension range of work.

 

Chromatics Lamp 💫 back to 2012 a collaboration with @entresuelo1a

A post shared by Hey (@heystudio) on Jul 13, 2017 at 11:32am PDT

7) Luke Choice: @velvetspectrum

Luke Choice is an Australian living in New York whose work covers graphic design, illustration, and typography. His style is very colorful and very unique — I especially love the 3D illustration work he does, some of which are crazy cool animations. Check out his Instagram feed to see his latest work, from his own personal projects to collaborations with brands like Nike. 

 

“Popping Pixels”

A post shared by Velvet Spectrum (@velvetspectrum) on Aug 30, 2017 at 6:43am PDT

Pop Art & Installation

8) Jessica Walsh: @jessicawalsh

I’m so inspired by Jessica Walsh, both as a designer and as an entrepreneur. She joined the design firm Sagmeister & Walsh, Inc. at age 23 — back when it was just Sagmeister, Inc. Two years later, the firm’s founder Stefan Sagmeister took her on as a partner when she was only 25, and the firm eventually became Sagmeister & Walsh. They’ve designed work for very high-profile clients, such as Levi’s and HBO.

Walsh’s Instagram account is a gorgeous display of her own work, the firm’s, and design inspiration from others. 

9) Daniel Aristizábal: @darias88

Colombian Digital Artist Daniel Aristizábal’s talent is transforming regular, everyday objects into surreal, colorful renditions that are full of character. His work is “saturated with science references, retro hues, strange imagery, bold geometric patterns, and a playful sense of the absurd,” reads his SkillShare bio.

Follow him on Instagram for a peek into how he sees the world, including the collaborations he’s worked on with clients like Toy Nail Polish and Refinery29.

10) Dschwen LLC: @dschwen

Dschwen LLC is a creative studio based in Minneapolis that employs collaborative designers throughout the United States. Their design projects are created mainly for brands — including some big names like Amazon, Apple, Juicy Couture, General Electric, Uber, Twitter, and more.

They’ve won a plethora of awards, including a Design Gold at Cannes Creativity Festival for the second image below, “traffic cone in disguise,” which they created for Twitter and Niche. Their Instagram page is chock full of creative, surprising, and clever designs — including some sweet animations.

11) Leta Obierajski: @letasobierajski

Leta Obierajski is a New York-based art director and graphic designer with an eye for bright colors, angles, and curves. What I like about her Instagram account in particular is that she writes descriptive Instagram captions that give her followers a behind-the-scenes look at her thoughts and processes, making for an incredibly interesting read.

For example, in her caption for the image below, she describes her collaboration with a fellow designer on this installation for local restaurant Le Turtle:

Color Palettes

12) Design Seeds: @designseeds

The folks behind Design Seeds’ Instagram account do a wonderful job of showing their followers just how important color schemes are to beautiful design. They use Instagram to create color palettes inspired by images submitted to them on Instagram using the #SeedsColor hashtag. This is a fun way to share their passion for nature’s beauty while encouraging engagement. 

 

today’s inspiration image for { market hues } is by @rotblaugelb … thank you, Julia, for another wonderful #SeedsColor image share!

A post shared by Jessica Colaluca, Design Seeds (@designseeds) on Sep 8, 2017 at 10:15am PDT 

13) Canva: @Canva

As a design tool, it makes sense that Canva’s Instagram account would be centered around design. Not only do they post gorgeous photos and design work, but I especially love their color palette series, where they create color palettes based on photos, much like Design Seeds.

As an added bonus, they include the names and hex codes of each color and prompt their followers to punch the hex codes into their Canva color wheel to use them in their own designs.

Street Art

14) Jaime Rojo: @bkstreetart

Jaime Rojo isn’t a street artist; he’s a photographer of street art. One of his goals, which he articulates on his website, is to photograph new public art, street art, graffiti, and urban art as they’re created, not just in Brooklyn, but all over the world (thanks to a partnership with Urban Nation Berlin). He keeps an eye on developing trends and strives to lead a worldwide conversation about how these trends affect popular and art culture. His Instagram is a live collection of his photographs, in which he credits and tags the artist when known.

 

Daze. For your eyes only. @dazeworldnyc #daze #streetart #nyc #muralart #urbanart #manhattan

A post shared by Brooklyn Street Art (@bkstreetart) on Aug 31, 2017 at 6:07pm PDT  

15) Biafra Inc.: @biafrainc

Biafra Inc. is an anonymous Minneapolis-based street artist who creates his work via spray paint, screen printing, stencils, stickers, and posters. As he tells it, his work is often “a visual retelling of stories that are apart of his life.” As a self-proclaimed news junkie, he also incorporates socio-political themes in his work from time to time. His Instagram account is an inspirational showcase of his work in a variety of urban environments all over the Midwest. 

biafrainc-instagram-4.png

16) Fumeroism: @fumeroism

“My art is an extension of my character, bold and uninhibited, assertive and unorthodox.” That’s how anonymous street artist Fumeroism describes his colorful, expressive, contemporary street art. His designs are often caricatures of real subjects, like his portrait of fellow street artist Sebastien Waknine in Barcelona in the image below. Follow Fumeroism on Instagram for colorful, bold, and energetic street art in locations all over the world.  

17) Banksy: @banksy

Unsurprisingly, the famous British street artist Banksy often goes for long peiods of time without posting to his Instagram account. And yes, it is his official account — Banksy’s publicist Jo Brooks confirmed it in a tweet:

But when he does, it’s not something you’ll want to miss.

For example, in February 2015, after almost a year and a half of nothing new on Instagram, Banksy posted a caption-less photo to his Instagram account of a brand new, never-before-seen piece of street art that Paste Magazine theorized appeared to be “done over a door. The location has not been discovered or revealed as of yet.” Follow his account to scroll through some of his great work and to stay in the loop in case a new piece appears.

Photography

18) VuThéara Kham: @vutheara

When it comes to beautiful photography, there are a whole lot of Instagrammers to choose from. One of my favorites is Paris-based photographer VuThéara Kham, who actually started his career on Instagram and became quite popular in the Instagram community. Follow his Instagram account for gorgeously framed photos of Paris’ (and other European cities’, as per below) landscapes and people.

 

Zurich by night 👫💙 #@visitzurich #visitzurich

A post shared by VuTheara Kham (@vutheara) on Sep 10, 2017 at 3:22am PDT

19) Hiroaki Fukuda: @hirozzzz

Instagram is actually the basis of Hiroaki Fukuda’s photography career, which is why his posts on there are so darn good. Like Kham, Fukuda started as an Instagram hobbyist in Tokyo and ended up gaining a huge following.

When big brands caught wind of his talent and began hiring him for different projects, he became a full-time Instagrammer. Now, he travels all over the world taking photos for companies like Nike and Christian Dior. Side note: He told CNN in an interview that he likes when people comment on his photos … so comment away! 

 

Another one from the 🕷

A post shared by Hiroaki Fukuda (@hirozzzz) on Aug 6, 2017 at 7:01am PDT

20) Dirk Bakker: @macenzo

Although Dirk Bakker is an Amsterdam-based graphic designer, he likes to take photographs of art, design, and architecture — and post it to his Instagram account. He has a keen eye for taking something “normal” — like cranes or a staircase — and transforming it into a stunning image with a great sense of depth. He’s especially talented at capturing repetitive patterns like lines, geometric shapes, forms, and colors, making for striking images with strong visual impacts.

 

Summer Balconies . #Brussels #SeeMyCity #Architecture #Minimal

A post shared by Dirk Bakker (@macenzo) on Jun 27, 2017 at 4:11am PDT

21) Max Wanger: @maxwanger

Max Wanger is a Los Angeles-based photographer who specializes in portraits, including wedding photos. His Instagram posts are a combination of his personal photography and the work he’s done for clients. What I love about his photos is that they have a romantic, personal touch, and often make beautiful use of negative space.

 

hope these cheer up those who need cheering.

A post shared by max wanger (@maxwanger) on Sep 10, 2017 at 5:25pm PDT

Typography

22) Erik Marinovich: @erikmarinovich

Erik Marinovich is a lettering artist and designer and an entrepreneur. In addition to drawing letters, logos, and type for big brands like Nike, Target, Google, Facebook, Sonos, and Sharpie, Marinovich has also co-founded Friends of Type, a collaborative blog and shop, and Title Case, a creative work space that runs workshops and lectures. His Instagram account is a great showcase of his impressive lettering work, from branded design work to impressively cool doodles.

23) Ahda: @misterdoodle

Ahda, the man behind the Mister Doodle pseudonym, is a hand letterer who’s done design work for big brands like Element Skateboards, The Sunday Times U.K., Citizen Apparel, and more. His specialty is incorporating his beautiful, curvy hand lettering into shapes and illustrations. Check out his Instagram for photographs of his lettering work, including t-shirt designs and creative showcases of his projects alongside relevant props.

24) Cyril Vouilloz: @rylsee

Cyril Vouilloz, a.k.a. Rylsee, is a Berlin-based designer with a fun and experimental take on typography. His unique hand-drawn lettering work plays with lines and dimensions — and what makes his Instagram posts so cool is that many of them show his fingers “interacting” with his illustrations, enhancing the optical illusions in a way that’ll blow your mind a little bit. Browse through his crazy cool work on Instagram, and follow him to see what original artwork and distortions he comes up with next.

25) Arabic Typography: @arabictypography

Beautiful typography doesn’t just mean Latin letters. In fact, some of the most beautiful typography in the world comes from Arabic script. There are many features that make Arabic lettering so aesthetic: It’s written from right to left, it can include accents and dots or lines, and its letters can vary in shape depending on their position in a word.

The Arabic Typography Instagram account, run by Egypt-based Noha Zayed, is a collection of beautiful Arabic typography — from signage to street art to tattoos — that’s crowdsourced from all over the world.

 

Found by @azaharaem in #Morocco. #foundkhtt

A post shared by #foundkhtt (@arabictypography) on Jul 31, 2017 at 2:45am PDT

Calligraphy

26) Seb Lester: @seblester

Artist and Designer Seb Lester is one of the most famous calligraphy artists on Instagram, with over one million followers (as of this posting). The vast majority of his posts are actually videos — and for good reason.

“So much of calligraphy is about movement and rhythm, and a short video can capture the beauty and the magic of calligraphy in a very Internet-friendly format,” he told The New Yorker. “Recurring words in people’s comments are ‘mesmerizing,’ ‘hypnotic,’ and ‘satisfying.’ For reasons I don’t fully understand, people clearly enjoy watching the process of something perceived as ‘perfect’ being made from start to finish.”

27) Lindsay Oshida: @lindsayoshida

Lindsay Oshida is a Los Angeles-based graphic designer who posts beautiful calligraphy work to her Instagram account. She gained a lot of attention on Instagram for her “Game of Thrones” quotes, which she posted once per day during the ten days leading up to the 2015 season premiere.

For example, she did her piece “Kill the crows” (the image below) in black letter with walnut ink, according to The New Yorker, and the black crows were sketched using a crow-quill nib — “a calligrapher in-joke.” She’s since posted quotes both from “Game of Thrones” and other popular TV shows, and claims other calligraphers have followed her lead.

We hope this list helped you find some new designers to follow. May your Instagram feed be much more beautiful for it!

View full article

Millennials might not be the nightmare employees everyone was worried about

office meeting coworkers

Much of the millennial generation is now safely ensconced in the office.

And, surprisingly, they’re not half bad.

A new study released by boutique research firm 747 Insights in partnership with consumer intelligence platform Collaborata found that “Playing against type, millennials are actually an employer’s dream.”

“For so long, people talked about the millennials as having helicopter parents, and them being unprepared, and their parents doing everything for them,” Michael Wood, principal at 747 Insights, told Business Insider. “They were entitled and they weren’t hard workers. I think they surprised a lot of people because they’re turning out to not be that at all.”

In the study, called “Generation Nation,” researchers surveyed over 4,000 Americans from their late teens to their early 70s to find out how they feel about everything from work to friendships to brands, and analyzed their responses. Millennials were defined as people born 1981-1997, meaning they’re currently ages 20-36.

“Millennials truly care about their work,” wrote the researchers. “And they care about it beyond being a means to a paycheck.”

This caring might have something to do with millennials’ hope for the future and their unwavering support for an employer they can believe in: “They’re very hopeful, and they have a positive outlook on their generation and what they’re going to contribute to the greater good,” Wood said. The Harvard Business Review recommended that to attract, keep, and engage millennials, a company must “have a deeply compelling vision” of how its work contributes to society.

Millennials are willing to work hard for an employer who supports them, and they tend to blur the lines between life and work, found the 747 Insight report — they’re more willing than members of other generations to catch up on work during their personal time.

Respondents from this age group were also the most likely to agree with the statements “If I work hard, I can do anything,” and “I believe in working hard and playing hard” — the latter is probably less surprising. And, while you can probably take this stat with a grain of self-aware salt, 57% of millennial survey respondents consider themselves to be hard workers.

Previous research came to different conclusions. For instance, Psychology professor Jean Twenge pointed to the Monitoring the Future project, which surveyed high school seniors starting in 1976 and found that millennial respondents were less willing to work hard, less willing to work overtime, and more interested in quitting work completely if they had enough money than previous generations were at the same age.

But now, millennials are a little older. And while there are certainly exceptions to the rule, it looks like millennial employees aren’t quite as bad as everyone thought they would be.

SEE ALSO: Millennials are turning out better than anyone expected — and it may be thanks to their parents

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: A leadership expert says too many 20-somethings make the same mistake when they take a new job

Read Original Article:

Allergan seeks tribe’s help in patent dispute

Dry-eye drug is at the center of a novel maneuver to squash generic competition

<img src="https://acs-h.assetsadobe.com/is/image//content/dam/cen/95/37/09537-notw10-restasiscxd.jpg" alt="TOC Graphic"

Source File:

Apple is still selling the iPhone 6s for a lower price, and it's a steal (AAPL)

Apple recently announced its shiny new iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X on Tuesday, and they bring new features and faster performance than any previous iPhone. 

However, I’m here to tell you that you that Apple is still selling the iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus for $450 and $550 repectively, and they’re an absolute steal if you’re not a heavy smartphone user. Better yet, you can get the 32GB iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus refurbished by Apple itself from Apple’s Refurbished Mac Store.

iphone 6s plus

I can understand if the word “refurbished” puts you off, but my experience with refurbished Apple products from Apple’s Refurbished Mac Store has been overwhelmingly positive. I bought two refurbished 2016 MacBook Pro laptops, saving a total of $900 in the process, and I couldn’t be happier with them. They look, feel, and work like new. 

From Apple’s refurbished store, you can get the 16GB iPhone 6s for $370, the 64GB model for $430, and the 128 GB model for $470. There doesn’t appear to be any refurbished 32GB iPhone 6s’ available at the moment, but even if you get the refurbished 64GB model, you’d be paying $20 less than a brand new 32GB model. It’s not much savings, but it’s something, and you don’t have to worry about storage. 

Refurbished iPhone 6s Plus models go for $450 for the 16GB model, $509 for the 64GB model, and $550 for the 128GB model.

iphone 6s plus back

I am a somewhat heavy smartphone user and I can safely say I’m still perfectly happy with my iPhone 6s Plus. I use my iPhone 6s Plus to stream radio and music, play YouTube videos, control my smart home, browse the web, email, message, take photos and videos, and call people on occasion. It feels just as snappy as the day I took it out of its box. 

Apple improved the screen on the latest iPhones, but my iPhone 6s Plus’ screen is just fine for my needs. Touch ID on the iPhone 6s is also still fast. The only thing I wish I had is the new fast-charging feature that Apple introduced to the new iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X. With that said, I’d still have to buy extra accessories to use fast charging on the new iPhones, a move by Apple that I’m not fond of. 

I understand the cameras on the iPhone 7, iPhone 7 Plus, iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X are better, but the camera on the iPhone 6s Plus, which is only two years old, is still excellent. Here’s a photo I took of the Na Pali Coast in Kauai, one of the Hawaiian islands, with my iPhone 6s Plus:

iphone 6s plus photo nepali coast hawaii

I rarely play games on my iPhone 6s Plus, and that’s when the iPhone 6s could begin to show its age. If you play graphics-heavy games on your smartphone, you may want to look at the iPhone 7 or iPhone 7 Plus, or even the latest iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, or iPhone X.

Buying any older device comes with the risk that it won’t last as long as buying the newer model. The iPhone 6s’ performance will surely slow down to the point where you’ll want to buy a new iPhone sooner than you would if you bought the new iPhones, or even the iPhone 7. That’s a risk you’ll have to determine yourself whether or not you want to take it, and it’s why I’d suggest buying the iPhone 6s, refurbished or not, if you’re a relatively light smartphone user. 

Plus, the iPhone 6s still has one feature that’s missing on the iPhone 7 and new iPhones: The headphone jack. 

For me, a somewhat heavy smartphone user, I feel like I’m still getting my money’s worth with the iPhone 6s Plus I bought almost two years ago. But I do expect it to slow down over the next year or so to the point where I’ll want to upgrade to whatever Apple has in store for us in 2018.

SEE ALSO: The iPhone 8 Plus will be Apple’s heaviest iPhone ever

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Hands-on with the new $999 Apple iPhone X

Read Original Article:

Top 10 Florida Meteorologists on Twitter

This week we salute the top Florida meteorologists at local television stations on Twitter, ranked by follower count. Followers were pulled on September 15, 2017 and may change over time.
 
1. Leigh Spann – WFLA-TV – 106,641

 
2. John Morales – WTVJ-TV – 56,142

 
3. Eduardo Rodriguez – WLTV-TV – 53,736

 
4. Paul Dellegatto –

For full article